2021 Virtual Conference Schedule

18-20 November 2021 via Zoom
2021 Conference Schedule
Registration Abstracts & Bios Coming Soon

2021 Virtual Conference

 Theme: Changing Tides: Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans on the Gulf Coast

Please be aware of your time zone: 10:00am CST = 9:00am Mountain/ 8:00 am Pacific/ 11:00 am Eastern.  In Europe: 10:00am CST = 4:00 pm UTC/GMT; 5:00 p.m CET

The Gulf Coast of the southern United States has been an area of intense human activity for millenia. Native Americans hunted and fished, developed agriculture, and produced works of art in this region as early as 11,000 BCE. Vast trade networks stretched across the land and water. Europeans entered the scene in the 16th century with destructive expeditions led by Panfilo de Narváez and Hernando de Soto. Enslaved Africans also were brought to Spanish Florida in the 16th century. The Gulf Coast saw increased exploration and settlement, cultural exchange, and exploitation — indeed, the ensuing centuries brought intensified and continuous change. This fascinating region offers the inspiration for our conference.

Thursday, 18 November 2021: Keynote Lecture

(The Zoom link provided to all conference registrants will work for all sessions)  5:00 p.m. CST

John S. Sledge

John S. Sledge

The Gulf of Mexico and Its Blended Cultural Legacies

John Sledge is an historian with keen interests in the history of Louisiana and the Gulf of Mexico.  He is the author of several books, including The Mobile River, These Rugged Days:  Alabama in the Civil War, and The Gulf of Mexico:  A Maritime History.

His presentation will broadly sketch the Gulf of Mexico’s geography and character, with emphasis on the people, cultures, and cities that have made it so distinctive.  The Gulf’s human history is notable for a rich blending manifested in everything from boats to architecture to speach and music in places as diverse as Havana, Veracruz, and new Orleans.  Additionally, recent episodes, such as the rare stranding of a sperm whale in Mobile By and the astonishing discovery of the last slave ship “Clotilda” in Mobile River will be highlighted.

Friday, 19 November 2021

(The Zoom link provided to all conference registrants will work for all sessions)
10:00 a.m. – 11:10 a.m.     Welcome and Session I: Understanding Early Florida

  • Welcome and Opening Remarks—Mirela Altić, President of the Society of the History of Discoveries and Professor of History at the University of Zagreb
  • “A Re-Examination of the Early Mapping of Southern Florida as an Archipelago” —Chet van Duzer (Rhode Island, USA)
  • “New Discoveries, Old Adversaries, and a Shifting Cultural Landscape: Florida’s British Period, 1763 -1783” —Rodney Kite-Powell (Florida, USA)

11:10 a.m. -11:25 a.m.  Break

11:25 a.m. -12:25 p.m.  Session II: People and the Environment in the Gulf Coast Region

  • “Changing identities, changing narratives? The narration of German settlers in Louisiana in an era of discovery, conquest and exploration” —Moritz Pöllath (Germany)
  • “’Impossible to Escape from that Part of the South:’ Fugitivity and the Geography of Self-Emancipation on the Gulf Coast” —William Smith (New Jersey, USA)

12:25 p.m.-12:55 p.m.  Break for lunch

12:55 p.m.-2:25 p.m. Session III:  Maps and People

  • “Mapping the Image of Others: Native Americans and Jesit Cartography of the Americas” —Mirela Altić  (Germany)
  • “Uncovering Art and History on Texas County Maps” —Mylynka Kilgore Cardona (Texas, USA)
  • “John Arrowsmith’s Maps of 1832: A Little-Known Revolution in Western Cartography” —Wesley Brown (Colorado, USA)

2:25 p.m.-2:45 p.m.  Break

2:45 p.m.-3:45 p.m. Session IV:  Exploration and Communication

  • “The Transnational Nature of Early Sixteenth Century Exploration: A Case Study” —Lydia Towns (Texas, USA)
  • “Politics by Other Means: Maritime Communication in Massachusetts and Labradore during the Imperial Crisis” —Stephen Hay, SHD Student Prize Winner, Graduate category (Canada)

3:45 p.m.  Close of Day 1

Saturday, 20 November 2021

(The Zoom link provided to all conference registrants will work for all sessions)

Please be aware of your time zone: 10:00am CST = 9:00am Mountain/ 8:00 am Pacific/ 11:00 am Eastern.  In Europe: 10:00am CST = 4:00 pm UTC/GMT; 5:00 p.m CET

10:00 a.m.- 11:00 a.m.  Welcome and Session V: Interactions of People and Places

  • “Entre el mapa y la pluma: the (de)configuration of Louisiana” —Guillermo Pupo Pernet (Arkansas, USA)
  • “Lidar and the Perplexing Pimple Mounds: Is there a Caddo Connection?” —F. Andrew Dowdy

11:00 a.m.-11:15 a.m.  Break

11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.  Session VI: Exploration and Africa

  • “The International Law of Colonialism in East AFrica: Germany, England, and the Doctrine of Discovery” —Robert Miller (Arizona, USA)
  • “Feminism, Power, and Niger Exploration: Accounts of Memorable Confrontations between the African Woman and the Nintheenth-Century European Explorer Mungo Park” —Nwankwo Tony Nwaezeigwe (Rwanda)

12:15 p.m -1:00 p.m.  Business Meeting

Business Meeting
Presentation of the 2021 Fellow of the Society for the History of Discoveries

1:00 p.m.-1:45 p.m. Lunch Break

1:45 p.m.-2:45 p.m. Session VII: Travelers in the Wider World

  • “Jan Nieuhoff in China for the Dutch United East India Company, 1655-1657” —Dennis Reinhartz (New Mexico, USA)
  • “Sir John Franklin: More than an Arctic Mystery” —Michaela Sapielak, SHD Student Prize winner, Undergraduate category (Canada)

2:45 p.m.-3:00 p.m.  Break

3:00 p.m.-3:45 p.m. Session VIII  Exploration and South America

  • “Empires of Guiana: Amerindian Contact and English Adventurism, 1595-1613” —John Harris (Alabama, USA)
  • “Depicting the Enterprise of Exploration: Portrayals in Nineteenth-Century Latin America Travelogues” —Richard Weiner (Indiana, USA)

3:45 p.m.  Thanks and Farewell – See You Next Year! —Mirela Altić

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